Is Zinc The Micronutrient You're Missing?

Zinc is an essential micronutrient that plays an important role in immune health. Let us help you find the best zinc supplement for your body’s needs.   


What exactly is zinc, and what makes it such an effective tool for fighting off illness? Here’s what to know about zinc, its benefits, and how you can incorporate more of this important micronutrient into your diet (including through supplementation with products such as Herdefense). 


What Is Zinc?


Elemental zinc is an essential micronutrient that plays a key role in immune and metabolism function.

Zinc has a long history of therapeutic use, but it has recently earned a lot of attention for its role in immune function and skin health. 


There are many zinc supplements from which you can choose, including Vitamin Code Raw Zinc, Nature’s Bounty Zinc, and Ionic Zinc. But if you’re looking for supplements that contain additional ingredients known to boost immune health, you may want to consider Herdefense over Vitamin Code Raw Zinc. Herdefense contains 16 mg of zinc citrate as well as vitamin C, herbs, and other nutrients for optimal immune function. Vitamin Code Raw Zinc, on the other hand, contains only zinc and vitamin C. 


What Are the Kinds of Zinc?


Zinc can be used both topically and internally, and it comes in many forms. When it’s used topically, it’s often in the form of zinc oxide or zinc pyrithione. Zinc oxide and zinc pyrithione may be applied to the skin in the form of pastes, creams, or ointments. These topical formulas are often used to minimize or prevent sunburn, diaper rash, and other skin conditions.


In addition to the two types of zinc mentioned above, there are many other forms of zinc. Let’s talk about these different forms and how they can benefit you.


Chelated Zinc Types


Chelated zinc is zinc that’s attached to another substance to make it more bioavailable. Chelated zinc is preferred over non-chelated zinc because it’s easier for the body to absorb. If you want to optimize zinc absorption when taking zinc tablets or supplements, here are a few common types of chelated zinc to try:


  • Zinc Citrate: This is one of the most common forms of zinc found in dietary supplements and is considered by many people to be the best zinc supplement form. This type of zinc is combined with citric acid and is water-soluble. Oral zinc citrate has a great taste and is a good form to take for immune system health. 
  • Zinc Acetate: Zinc acetate is produced by combining acetic acid with zinc. It’s recommended that you take zinc acetate lozenges when you first begin experiencing cold symptoms (preferably within the first 24 hours of symptom onset). Taking zinc acetate during the initial symptoms of sickness could increase your rate of recovery substantially. 
  • Zinc Orotate: This form of zinc is bound to orotic acid. It is readily absorbed by the body and is a popular form of supplemental zinc. 
  • Zinc Gluconate: It may sound strange, but zinc gluconate is created by fermenting glucose. Zinc gluconate has a long shelf life, which is why it is commonly put into over-the-counter supplements. 
  • Zinc Picolinate: zinc picolinate is combined with picolinic acid (from tryptophan). Zinc picolinate is commonly used to prevent or treat zinc deficiency. 
  • Zinc Monomethionine: This form of zinc is bound to methionine (an amino acid). Because methionine is the most readily absorbed amino acid by the body, it is thought that zinc monomethionine may be the most readily absorbed form of zinc. 
  • Zinc Bisglycinate: This is another form of chelated zinc and is well-tolerated by most people. It’s comprised of two glycine molecules and one zinc molecule. Like other forms of zinc, it can support the immune system. 
  • Zinc Glycinate: Zinc glycinate is a combination of zinc and glycine (an amino acid). Zinc glycinate supports a variety of neurological and immune functions in the body. 

Since the human body doesn’t easily digest zinc, it’s wise to choose zinc lozenges or zinc supplements that contain one or more of the above forms of chelated zinc. 


Inorganic Zinc Types


Though they are not as bioavailable to your body as chelated types, the following inorganic forms of zinc can also be found in some zinc supplements:


  • Zinc Oxide: This form of zinc is often used in topical zinc products for skin health. Zinc oxide is also sometimes taken as an oral supplement, but it is much less bioavailable than chelated forms of zinc. 
  • Zinc Sulfate: This is an inorganic, water-soluble form of zinc. It may cause stomach irritation and is not frequently recommended for internal use. 

Zinc products can combat illness in a variety of ways. While some types are designed to be taken internally in the form of zinc supplements, others can help the body in other ways (such as zinc nasal spray for congestion and nasal infections).  


What Are the Signs of Zinc Deficiency?


Zinc deficiency is fairly common. You may benefit from increasing your zinc intake or taking a zinc supplement if you experience the following symptoms:


  • Delayed wound healing
  • Loss of appetite
  • Hair loss
  • Impaired immune function
  • Mental lethargy
  • Impotence
  • Taste abnormalities
  • Diarrhea
  • Skin and eye lesions

You may also want to raise your zinc level through supplementation if you have taken or are currently taking thiazide diuretics. Thiazide diuretics can significantly increase your body’s urinary excretion of zinc. 


What Are the Benefits of a Zinc Supplement?


Are you wondering why we need zinc? Here are some of the benefits this important micronutrient can provide:


  • Accelerated wound healing
  • Improved testosterone levels (so slip some to your man if he’s in a funk!)
  • Improved immune function (especially when combined with vitamin C)
  • Reduced risk of pneumonia, age-related macular degeneration, and other age-related diseases
  • Decreased inflammation throughout the body
  • Improved blood sugar levels

In addition to these benefits, zinc can also help skin and hair health. The link between zinc and skin health is documented and gives us one more reason why we need to focus on zinc in nutrition (especially if we’re prone to skin blemishes). 


How Can I Incorporate Zinc in My Diet?


There are a few easy ways to incorporate zinc into your diet. Here are our top suggestions:


  • Eat more foods containing zinc (such as beef, pork, chicken, salmon, lobster, breakfast cereals, dairy products, nuts, and beans). 
  • Research the best zinc supplements for your body’s needs
  • Suck on zinc lozenges when you start to feel under the weather

These are all great ways to boost your zinc levels so your body is well-equipped to fight off illnesses all year round. 


How Much Zinc Should I Take?


The recommended daily amount for zinc is just 8 milligrams for women (though it jumps up to 13 mg if you are pregnant or lactating). But it is safe to take extra zinc to boost your immunity. The upper tolerable daily limit is 40 mg for adults. Taking excess zinc above 40 mg per day could lead to symptoms of zinc toxicity, including:


  • Diarrhea
  • Headaches
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Reduced immune function
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Loss of appetite
  • Decreased HDL (good) cholesterol levels

Taking too much zinc could also interfere with your body’s absorption of copper, which could potentially lead to a copper deficiency. For best results, avoid taking more than 40 mg of zinc per day.  


How Can Herdefense Benefit Me by Increasing Zinc Intake?


Herdefense is a high-quality zinc supplement that also contains other immune-boosting ingredients. If you’ve been searching for the best zinc supplement (that doesn’t have a bad after-taste like zinc lozenges), Herdefense is an excellent choice. It tastes amazing and will help you feel your best. For more tips and tricks about improving your health with help from top-quality dietary supplements, visit Mixhers resources today.